• Cooling India
  • Jul 25, 2018

European Parliament Approves Revised Energy Performance of Buildings Directive

The Commission welcomes final vote on energy performance of buildings…


 The European Parliament has just approved the revised Energy Performance of Buildings Directive that will be published in the official journal of the union in near future.

Upcoming New Targets for Energy Efficiency in Buildings

  With the new EPBD the Commission wants the EU to lead the clean energy transition. For this reason, the EU has committed to cut CO2 emissions by at least 40% by 2030 while modernising the EU’s economy and delivering on jobs and growth for all European citizens. In doing so, the Commission is guided by three main goals:

• Putting energy efficiency first
• Achieving global leadership in renewable energies
• Providing a fair deal for consumers.

Upto now, the European Commission Lists the Main Achievements of the new EPBD:

• Creates a clear path towards a low and zero-emission building stock in the EU by 2050 underpinned by national roadmaps to decarbonise buildings.
• Encourages the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and smart technologies to ensure buildings operate efficiently for example by introducing automation and control systems.
• Supports the rollout of the infrastructure for e-mobility in all buildings (although to a lesser extent than in the Commission’s proposal).
• Introduces a ‘smart readiness indicator’ which will measure the buildings’ capacity to use new technologies and electronic systems to adapt to the needs of the consumer, optimise its operation and interact with the grid.
• Integrates and substantially strengthens long-term building renovation strategies. • Mobilises public and private financing and investment.
• Helps combatting energy poverty and reducing the household energy bill by renovating older buildings.

Towards the definition of a Smart Readiness Indicator

  The revised Energy Performance of Building Directive has been just approved by the EU parliament, and in the coming weeks will be published in the Official Journal of the Union. In the meanwhile, we will give an insight on the main achievements promoted by the new EPBD.

  One of the most innovative point is the introduction of a ‘smart readiness indicator’ which will measure the buildings’ capacity to use new technologies and electronic systems to adapt to the needs of the consumer, optimise its operation and interact with the grid. In this regard, from February 2017, a consortium of experts coordinated by Vito is working for set the framework for defining and evaluating the smart readiness indicator for new buildings.

  It will be based on the analysis of the smart ready services available on a building. These smart services are focusing on optimization, interaction with occupants, interoperability and interaction with the energy grid. There will be a catalogue reporting all the services and including all the functionality levels as well the assessment of their impacts on the building operation. Such impacts cover the aspects of energy savings on site, flexibility for the energy grid and storage, selfgeneration of energy, comfort, convenience, health, maintenance and fault prediction as well as information provided to the occupant.

  The methodology is still in a fine-tuning phase and will be tested on a series of relevant case studies. The new release of the EPBD will encourage the Member States to set targets that are more ambitious and to strengthen the national building renovation strategies, as defined after the Energy Efficiency Directive launched in 2014. What has been done so far?

  The JRC has carried out an analysis of the building renovation strategies submitted by the EU Member States in the frame of the Energy Efficiency Directive.

  Ten strategies resulted to be fully compliant to requirements of Article 4 of EED and rapresent best practices: Czech Republic, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Lithuania, Romania, Slovenia, Spain and the United Kingdom.